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6th April 2014

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J E S S I C A  L E D W I C H Monstrous Feminine

J E S S I C A L E D W I C H Monstrous Feminine

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5th April 2014

Photo reblogged from DASEINSEESCRIBEJUNTO with 2 notes

daseinseescribejunto:

Ver lo que ponen tus conocidos en Facebook

daseinseescribejunto:

Ver lo que ponen tus conocidos en Facebook

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24th March 2014

Photo with 1 note

French artist Silvia Radelli has transformed the Parisian Metro map into a female  paradise



http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2014/03/19/silvia_radelli_reimagines_paris_metro_map_naming_stations_after_susan_sontag.html

French artist Silvia Radelli has transformed the Parisian Metro map into a female paradise

http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2014/03/19/silvia_radelli_reimagines_paris_metro_map_naming_stations_after_susan_sontag.html

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22nd March 2014

Photo reblogged from The Oddment Emporium with 869 notes

atlasobscura:

Morbid Monday: Mummified Charms and Amulets of the Lovett Collection.
Displayed for the first time to the public in 1917, the mummified heart was once the property of Edward Lovett, an eccentric British erudite and wealthy chief cashier in the bank of the City of London who, in his spare time, was the most relentless archivist of his era. A member of the Folklore Society since 1900, Lovett had one very unusual obsession: once off work, he would spend his free time strolling through the slums of Edwardian London to collect evidence of magic and medicinal practices, vernacular beliefs that the century of industrialization and rational sciences hadn’t eliminated. From his urban explorations, conversation with street sellers, sailors, and working classes witches, Lovett accumulated an astonishing array of charms, an incredible collection of odds and ends that proved superstitions were an invisible, yet persistent, practice, even in modern England.
Read more about the magic relics of modern England here !

atlasobscura:

Morbid Monday: Mummified Charms and Amulets of the Lovett Collection.

Displayed for the first time to the public in 1917, the mummified heart was once the property of Edward Lovett, an eccentric British erudite and wealthy chief cashier in the bank of the City of London who, in his spare time, was the most relentless archivist of his era. A member of the Folklore Society since 1900, Lovett had one very unusual obsession: once off work, he would spend his free time strolling through the slums of Edwardian London to collect evidence of magic and medicinal practices, vernacular beliefs that the century of industrialization and rational sciences hadn’t eliminated. From his urban explorations, conversation with street sellers, sailors, and working classes witches, Lovett accumulated an astonishing array of charms, an incredible collection of odds and ends that proved superstitions were an invisible, yet persistent, practice, even in modern England.

Read more about the magic relics of modern England here !

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21st March 2014

Photo reblogged from The Oddment Emporium with 10,179 notes

slumgiltsoul:

金繕い

slumgiltsoul:

金繕い

(Source: ismiledsweetly)

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21st March 2014

Photo reblogged from The Oddment Emporium with 1,392 notes

theoddmentemporium:

The Louvre Doll
The Louvre Doll is a 4th century clay figure impaled with thirteen bronze needles. It was discovered within a terracotta vase alongside a lead curse tablet engraved with a binding spell - a type of curse in which usually someone has asked the gods to do harm to another. The figure, with its hands bound behind its back, represents the intended target.

theoddmentemporium:

The Louvre Doll

The Louvre Doll is a 4th century clay figure impaled with thirteen bronze needles. It was discovered within a terracotta vase alongside a lead curse tablet engraved with a binding spell - a type of curse in which usually someone has asked the gods to do harm to another. The figure, with its hands bound behind its back, represents the intended target.

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21st March 2014

Photo with 1 note

Extispicium Relief.

Left panel of the relief “Sacrifice in front of the Temple of Juppiter Capitolinus.”
Marble. Ca. 118—125 A.D.

Extispicium Relief.

Left panel of the relief “Sacrifice in front of the Temple of Juppiter Capitolinus.”
Marble. Ca. 118—125 A.D.

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26th January 2014

Quote reblogged from MODERN BABYLON with 395 notes

Melancholy, being a kind of vacatio, separation of soul from body, bestowed the gift of clairvoyance and premonition. In the classifications of the Middle Ages, melancholy was included among the seven forms of vacatio, along with sleep, fainting, and solitude. The state of vacatio is characterized by a labile link between soul and body which makes the soul more independent with regard to the sensible world and allows it to neglect its physical matrix in order, in some way, better to attend to its own business.
 Ioan P. Couliano, from Eros and Magic in the Renaissance (University of Chicago Press, 1987)

(Source: cerasiferae)

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26th January 2014

Photo reblogged from My Knickers Hanging with 197,604 notes

lenaprado:

In today’s edition of ‘Unnecessarily Gendered Items’

lenaprado:

In today’s edition of ‘Unnecessarily Gendered Items’

(Source: sterling-archers)

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22nd December 2013

Photo reblogged from My Knickers Hanging with 505 notes

(Source: feminismeagressif)

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21st December 2013

Video reblogged from NIENTE CHE AMORE with 91 notes

En esta casa vemos religiosamente Person of interest y no es por las razones equivocadas.

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14th November 2013

Photo reblogged from elbailedesanvito with 2 notes

elbailedesanvito:

Eva Canning, you of November evenings, lost and hopeless and hungry, crouched in the dark, sending the hounds scrambling back to their vexed masters. They’d already slaughtered so many of your children. And here the men sit all a long winter’s night, at the mouth of your den in the rocks, vexing themselves. Rocks slippery with snow and ice and the blood not yet spilled to avenge livestock. Putnam made a torch of birch bark and with a rope he bade them lower him into the crevice because if you want something done they say do it yourself if you want it done right. Don’t leave it to the dogs who once were wolves themselves, so let’s consider a conspiracy of canine coconspirators. Let’s suppose, as we suppose uncounted mustard seeds spell certain and not unknown doom. Good and righteous Squire Putnam, Patron Saint of sheep and goats, kids and lambs, mutton chops, lowered head down into the stinking maw of surely unknown blackness to exorcise the imp of Pomfret which was known lately to stalk frosty fields. Here he is, choosing the Road of Needles, for the sake of good Christian farmers of New England. Wolves who do evil out of ravenous hunger in the dead of winter. My headlights illuminating along back roads, not going anywhere on purpose, and ignorant of the mock-turtle heroics of Israel Putnam and the ghost he let loose that night so long ago when all my research has revealed the Holy Bible makes thirteen references to wolves. I’ve got a list right here. Try Acts 10:29. Skip this version. Remind me later.
Caitlín R. Kiernan. The Drowning Girl.

elbailedesanvito:

Eva Canning, you of November evenings, lost and hopeless and hungry, crouched in the dark, sending the hounds scrambling back to their vexed masters. They’d already slaughtered so many of your children. And here the men sit all a long winter’s night, at the mouth of your den in the rocks, vexing themselves. Rocks slippery with snow and ice and the blood not yet spilled to avenge livestock. Putnam made a torch of birch bark and with a rope he bade them lower him into the crevice because if you want something done they say do it yourself if you want it done right. Don’t leave it to the dogs who once were wolves themselves, so let’s consider a conspiracy of canine coconspirators. Let’s suppose, as we suppose uncounted mustard seeds spell certain and not unknown doom. Good and righteous Squire Putnam, Patron Saint of sheep and goats, kids and lambs, mutton chops, lowered head down into the stinking maw of surely unknown blackness to exorcise the imp of Pomfret which was known lately to stalk frosty fields. Here he is, choosing the Road of Needles, for the sake of good Christian farmers of New England. Wolves who do evil out of ravenous hunger in the dead of winter. My headlights illuminating along back roads, not going anywhere on purpose, and ignorant of the mock-turtle heroics of Israel Putnam and the ghost he let loose that night so long ago when all my research has revealed the Holy Bible makes thirteen references to wolves. I’ve got a list right here. Try Acts 10:29. Skip this version. Remind me later.

Caitlín R. Kiernan. The Drowning Girl.

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9th November 2013

Video reblogged from My Knickers Hanging with 104,093 notes

(Source: psicologicamenteblog)

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1st November 2013

Photo with 3 notes

Princess Marie Curie. Via. 

Princess Marie Curie. Via

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1st November 2013

Photo with 2 notes

Via. 

Via

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